Technology and Science

Poachers are hacking scientific data to hunt the animals being studied

Friday February 10, 2017 more stories from this episode This week, the first wild bison to roam Banff National Park in more than a century were shipped to a remote valley in within the park, with the goal of re-establishing a thriving herd in the area. Sixteen bison, including two that are pregnant, will spend the next 16 months in ...

Read More »

Scientists create beating 3D heart cells

Scientists at York University have created 3D heart cells that are able to beat in synchronization with existing heart cells.  Until now, most 2D and 3D heart tissue didn’t beat at the same time as natural heart tissue and required medical scaffolding to allow it to beat and grow.  Previous research at the University of Toronto grew 3D heart cells on such ...

Read More »

Warm ocean water triggered vast seabird die-off, experts say

A year after tens of thousands of common murres, an abundant North Pacific seabird, starved and washed ashore on beaches from California to Alaska, researchers have pinned the cause to unusually warm ocean temperatures that affected the tiny fish they eat.   Elevated temperatures in seawater affected wildlife in a pair of major marine ecosystems along the West Coast and ...

Read More »

Trump administration delays adding bumblebee to endangered list

The Trump administration on Thursday delayed what would be the first endangered designation for a bee species in the continental U.S., one day before it was to take effect. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service adopted a rule Jan. 11 extending federal protection to the rusty patched bumblebee, one of many types of bees that play a vital role in ...

Read More »

A full moon, an eclipse and a comet — all in one night

Friday is a night full of fun astronomical treats. First, there’s February’s full moon, called the Snow Moon — named for the typically cold and snowy weather this time of year. All full moons are given nicknames, such as January’s Wolf Moon, the Strawberry Moon in May, and, of course, the Harvest Moon — the one nearest the autumnal equinox in either ...

Read More »

Why job stealing robots might liberate us from the tedium of work

Thursday February 09, 2017 more stories from this episode Your occupation may soon be taken over by robots. There’s no shortage of scary predictions that millions will soon lose their jobs due to automation. And those predictions can invoke gloomy visions of a future where the rich own the robots, the well-educated have jobs, and the rest of us struggle. ...

Read More »

Anyone can be an internet troll if the situation is right

The picture you have of an internet troll may not be as accurate as you think. In fact, new research finds that a troll could be anyone if the circumstances are right. Researchers at Stanford University and Cornell University recently looked into what creates internet trolls.  “While the common knowledge is that trolls are particularly sociopathic individuals that occasionally appear ...

Read More »

Can sharks be fished sustainably?

Canadian filmmaker and conservationist Rob Stewart was best known as a man who loved sharks. The documentarian was filming in the Florida Keys when he disappeared during a dive earlier this month. Following a days-long search, his body was found last week.  Stewart was a vocal opponent of shark fishing. But just how big of a problem is the shark trade? ...

Read More »

Climate change, fishing threaten endangered African penguin

Climate change and fishing practices are contributing to increased losses of the already endangered African penguin, a new study has found. Researchers discovered juvenile African penguins are being led into “ecological traps.” These traps occur as the young penguins follow cues in the water that lead them to what should be rich feeding grounds, but once they get there, it’s ...

Read More »

More frequent, stronger earthquakes linked to fracking, Alberta study finds

Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing in Western Canada are becoming stronger and more frequent, according to a study from the University of Alberta. From December 2013 to February 2016, researchers detected 250 seismic events within 100 kilometres of Fox Creek, Alta., that measured greater than 2.5 on the Richter Scale. During a three-year period from 2010 to 2013, they recorded fewer than 10 seismic ...

Read More »