Technology and Science

In fight for free speech, researchers test anti-censorship tool built into the internet’s core

When the Chinese government wanted to keep its users off Facebook and Google, it blocked the entire county’s access to the U.S. companies’ apps and sites. And when citizens started using third-party workarounds — like Tor, proxies and VPNs — to get around those blocks, it moved to quash those, too.  So a handful of researchers came up with a crazy idea: ...

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SpaceX successfully delivers experiments, treats to space station

A SpaceX shipment arrived at the International Space Station on Wednesday, delivering a bonanza of science experiments. The SpaceX Dragon capsule pulled up following a two-day flight from Cape Canaveral. NASA astronaut Jack Fischer used the space station’s hefty robot arm to grab the Dragon 400 kilometres above the Pacific, near New Zealand. The Dragon holds 2.7 tonnes of cargo, ...

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Petya ransomware cost world’s biggest container ship company up to $300M

The June cyberattack that paralyzed the computer systems in companies around the world is estimated to have cost the world’s biggest container shipping line between $200 million and $300 million US, A.P. Moller-Maersk said Wednesday. The Copenhagen-based group, which was particularly severely affected by the attack, says the impact will first be reflected in its third-quarter results as revenue was mainly lost ...

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Autonomous glider to track critically endangered right whales

Scientists in Halifax are launching a high-tech tool to track the whale population on the Scotian Shelf. A solar-power Wave Glider, equipped with an underwater microphone, will be deployed Wednesday off the coast and spend 30 days listening for the characteristic sounds of endangered North Atlantic right whales. “What this Wave Glider allows us to do is to go out and do some ...

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Lake trout ‘a canary in a coal mine’ for climate change: researcher

A new study out of the University of Manitoba shows some lake predators are changing their behaviour due to climate change, which may have a wide-ranging effect on aquatic ecosystems. Researchers watched the feeding habits of lake trout at the IISD Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario over an 11-year span and found the fish can quickly adapt their behaviour ...

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High-powered scans and X-rays give glimpse into T. rex ancestor

Researchers at a top U.S. laboratory announced Tuesday that they have produced the highest resolution scan ever done of the inner workings of a fossilized tyrannosaur skull using neutron beams and high-energy X-rays, resulting in new clues that could help paleontologists piece together the evolutionary puzzle of the monstrous T. rex. Officials with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New ...

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Deadly summer puts endangered right whales at risk

A high number of accidental deaths this year among the endangered North Atlantic right whale threaten the survival of the species, according to conservation groups and marine scientists. The right whales, which summer off of New England and Canada, are among the most imperiled marine mammals on Earth. There are thought to be no more than 500 of the giant ...

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Total solar eclipse 2017: Read CBC’s complete coverage

Some Canadians are driving south to see the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, while some NASA-funded scientists will be chasing it in retrofitted jets. The eclipse — the first to cross the U.S. coast to coast in almost a century — will also provide a celestial show to people north of the border, though the partial eclipse visible in Canada won’t ...

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Here’s when to start watching the solar eclipse

In one week, millions of heads across North America will be turned skyward to watch a much-anticipated event: the solar eclipse. Though dubbed the Great American Eclipse because totality will occur across a swath of the U.S. stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, Canada will be treated to an eclipse as well: a partial solar eclipse. The eclipse will be ...

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Numbers show fewer people being struck by lightning

Lightning — once one of nature’s biggest killers —is claiming far fewer lives in the United States, mostly because people have learned to get out of the way. In the 1940s, when there were fewer people, lightning killed more than 300 people annually. So far this year, 13 people have died after being struck, on pace for a record low of ...

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