Health

Canadian doctor Rob Fowler recognized for life-saving treatment in Ebola outbreak

Wednesday April 19, 2017 more stories from this episode When Canadian Dr. Rob Fowler arrived in West Africa shortly after the Ebola outbreak began in 2014, he saw an opportunity to change the way patients were treated. As an ongoing consultant for the World Health Organization, Dr. Fowler was one of the first international doctors to help treat infected patients. With the ...

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New prostate cancer survey examines range of factors affecting quality of life

A new survey of prostate cancer patients and survivors will look at the factors that contribute to quality of life. Gabriela Ilie, research chair and assistant professor at Dalhousie University, is on P.E.I. to talk to the prostate cancer support group, as well as urologists and radiation oncologists. “Patients with prostate cancer often have extended life expectancy,” she said, pointing out ...

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Bored of your Fitbit? Winnipeg researcher explains how motivations change over time

If you’re one of the millions of people who purchased a fitness tracker in recent years, you may have personally experienced what one University of Winnipeg researcher calls the “attentional switch.” New research done by consumer psychology expert Olya Bullard suggests when people embark on a new goal — like losing weight — their attention tends to shift from a more positive outlook in the ...

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Probiotic yogurt benefits vary, study finds

It’s a daunting aisle in the supermarket filled with tubs of yogurt. Before you grab one, keep in mind that all probiotic products aren’t equal, according to a new study. Mary Scourboutakos, a postdoctoral researcher, was inspired to study probiotic yogurt when she was trying to figure out what to eat. The publication of her study in Wednesday’s issue of ...

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Woman calls on Nova Scotia to update rules on breast reduction surgery

A Halifax-area woman is calling for the province to update its rules governing who can and can’t get breast reduction surgery covered by Nova Scotia’s health care system.  Melody Harding says she experiences back and shoulder problems and wants to get the surgery. But Nova Scotia will only pay for the operation if a person has a body mass index of 27 or ...

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Respiratory problems affect 1 in 5 firefighters after Fort McMurray wildfire

Nearly a year after a wildfire devastated Fort McMurray, many firefighters who worked to save the city are facing lingering health problems, according to preliminary findings of new research. The University of Alberta study found one in five of the 355 firefighters surveyed reported persistent respiratory issues including coughing, breathlessness, wheezing and chest tightness. And they’re battling more than just physical ailments — mental-health issues affect ...

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Women seem less likely to get surgery in war-torn countries

Working as a surgeon in sub-Saharan Africa, Sherry Wren couldn’t help but wonder why so many more men than women sought her care. Her curiosity led her to ask Doctors Without Borders for data on surgeries conducted in its humanitarian projects in 12 war-torn countries in Africa and the Middle East. Between 2008 and 2014, the nonprofit organization performed the ...

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More flour brands added to Robin Hood national flour recall

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has added more brands of flour and flour products to the national recall it issued April 4 over fears of E. coli contamination. The initial recall issued on March 28 applied only to Robin Hood flour sold in four provinces in Western Canada. This is the second time more brands have been added to the recall list. The items were ...

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ENCORE: Hate the gym? History explains why the treadmill can feel like torture

Monday April 17, 2017 more stories from this episode Read story transcript In 1817, English engineer William Cubitt invented the treadmill — or the treadwheel, as it was called back then. Its purpose was to punish prisoners. Penal reforms back then had aimed to reduce use of the death penalty, and hard labour took its place, with prisoners like Oscar ...

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Tributes flow for Windsor man who lobbied for assisted-dying rights for mentally ill

A Windsor man who urged the federal government to legalize doctor-assisted dying for people like himself with mental illness has taken his own life. Adam Maier-Clayton’s mother, Margaret Maier, said in a Facebook post she was “devastated” that her “beautiful son” had committed suicide. “My son has been on a campaign for several years now on the right to die ...

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