Health

Via Rail changes policy on wheelchairs, mobility aids on trains

Via Rail has changed its policy on wheelchairs and other mobility aids to comply with a federal order demanding it make its trains more accessible to those who use the devices. The national rail provider had been fighting an order from the Canadian Transportation Agency to allow more than one mobility device at a time to be tied down on ...

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Health minister sees ‘clean heroin’ as potential saviour for some opioid addicts

Giving people with severe addictions prescription heroin could save lives as Canada continues to struggle with an opioid overdose epidemic, says Health Minister Jane Philpott. “I know this is a challenging concept for some people to think about, but the reality is that when people go out on the streets they often commit crimes to be able to get the drugs ...

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SECOND OPINION | Are animals born with the ability to count?

Hello and happy Saturday! Here’s our roundup of the week’s interesting and eclectic news in health and medical science. If you haven’t subscribed yet, you can do that by clicking here. Are animals born with the ability to count? Some scientists say yes, and point to examples where pigeons, dolphins and monkeys have learned to use symbols that represent quantities. And some neuroscientists believe an ...

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Pool parasite: Swimmers urged to take simple steps to avoid Cryptosporidium

Before dipping into a swimming pool or lake this long weekend, take precautions against stomach-turning parasites that may lurk in the water, public health officials say. Swallowing just a mouthful of water contaminated with the parasite Cryptosporidium, or Crypto, can make otherwise healthy people sick for up to three weeks with watery diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, or vomiting and can lead ...

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‘I went into distress’: patient wakes up during surgery

more stories from this episode *Warning: Details in this story may make some listeners uncomfortable. It’s a nightmare portrayed in movies — being conscious and aware during a surgery — but being unable to alert the doctors and nurses around you. Donna Penner can tell you it does happen. ‘I was feeling the pain as he made the incision and I was panicking on ...

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Doctors warn General Hospital cancer plot may be a sneaky pharmaceutical ad campaign

Friday May 19, 2017 more stories from this episode Doctors are sounding the alarm about a cancer plot line on the long-running soap opera General Hospital, warning that it may lead to the over diagnosis of a rare disease, and the use of a drug to treat it. The episodes were produced in collaboration with a drug company. This year on ...

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Almost 40 per cent of Canadians eat lunch at their desks, new research shows

Almost 40 per cent of Canadians are eating lunch at their desks — a number that reflects increasing workplace pressures as well as shifting attitudes toward meals, says the lead author of a new study gauging the country’s eating habits. The survey, which was conducted by Nova Scotia’s Dalhousie University, found that 39 per cent of respondents ate at their ...

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Living with lupus: what it’s like having an invisible illness

Lisa Walters looks like your average 28-year-old, but her days are filled with doctor’s appointments and discomfort. After more than 10 years of misdiagnosis, Walters was diagnosed with lupus last year. “Your immune system starts attacking healthy cells in your body, and so the version I have which is systemic means that it can attack anywhere in your body,” Walters ...

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Food insecurity in Nunavut ‘should be considered a national crisis,’ expert says

Food insecurity in Nunavut “needs remedial action,” say the authors of a new report who call for a national food policy. The Conference Board of Canada released its 2016 food report card on provincial performance, which looks at industry prosperity, healthy food and diets, food safety, household food security and environmental sustainability. The group defined food insecurity in terms of affordability, availability and utilization, ...

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Opioid conflict-of-interest controversy reveals extent of big pharma’s ties to doctors

It’s a bad day when the federal health minister wants to check your work. But that’s what’s happening to a McMaster University committee that was assigned to develop new opioid-prescribing guidelines for Canada’s doctors.  The rules from Health Canada were clear when it awarded the half-million-dollar grant to McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote National Pain Centre in 2015: No one with any ties to big pharma could be allowed to vote ...

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