Health

How table salt developed at U of T is saving millions of lives in India

When Levente Diosady was tasked two decades ago with finding a way to add iron into the diets of people in developing countries and save millions of lives, he took it with a grain of salt — literally. Diosady, a food engineering professor at the University of Toronto, found a way to add iron to table salt but it took a ...

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Feds investigating as B.C. oyster norovirus outbreak spreads

An outbreak of norovirus linked to B.C.-harvested oysters is now under federal investigation. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) says it has taken on a leadership role in the investigation, now that cases have been reported in Alberta and Ontario, as well as B.C. As of Feb. 14, the agency says it’s aware of 221 reported cases of norovirus connected ...

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U.S. shuts high-security labs over concerns about air hose safety

CDC conducting safety tests to determine whether scientists might have been exposed to harmful chemicals Thomson Reuters Posted: Feb 17, 2017 4:14 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 17, 2017 4:14 PM ET The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has closed down its highest security laboratories after discovering that hoses that supply air to scientists wearing special protective suits were never approved ...

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B.C. signing health-care deal with federal government, including money for opioid crisis

British Columbia is signing on to the health-care deal with the federal government, CBC News has learned. The deal, which will be announced at 2 p.m. ET (11 a.m. PT) today, allows B.C. to receive its share of new federal funding for home care and mental health. The federal government will also provide additional funding to the province to assist ...

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How to improve the ‘health literacy’ of parents caring for kids with chronic kidney disease

Even well-educated parents may struggle to comprehend how to manage their child’s medications and tests to prevent relapses of a chronic disease, according to Canadian specialists. Children with nephrotic syndrome, a chronic kidney disease, frequently relapse and need their parents to manage their care by regularly testing urine, giving medications by following a complicated schedule, monitoring signs and symptoms, and adjusting doses. ...

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Are face transplants still research? surgeons ask

Is replacing a severely disfigured person’s face with one from a dead donor ready to be called regular care, something insurers should cover? Mayo Clinic has raised that question by doing the first U.S. face transplant that’s not part of research. Faces, hands, wombs and even a penis have been transplanted in recent years. Unlike liver or heart transplants, these ...

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College of Family Physicians calls for review of Safe Third Country Agreement

A physician’s organization wants a review of an agreement that it says is preventing refugees coming from the U.S. to seek asylum in Canada. The College of Family Physicians of Canada says it is worried about the health of migrants who have suffered from exposure to extreme winter cold after crossing into Manitoba and other provinces. Dr. David White, president ...

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Waterloo woman makes picture books for adults with dementia, Alzheimer’s

When Rachel Thompson’s grandmother read the front page headline on the local newspaper one morning, the family was shocked – not because of what the headline said, but because her grandmother knew what it said. “We all thought that she could no longer read, because she just wasn’t reading in the way that she was reading before,” Thompson said, adding her grandmother ...

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It takes longer for Canadians to get health care, but is it worth the wait?

Canadians wait longer for health care than people in many other countries, but are generally more satisfied with their experience once they are seen, according to a new report. The Canadian Institute for Health Information‘s report released Thursday is titled “How Canada Compares,” and based on results from the Commonwealth Fund’s 2016 survey of adults in 11 countries. “Canadians continue to report longer wait times ...

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Millbrook youth make video to uplift Indigenous youth contemplating suicide

A youth group on the Millbrook First Nation in Truro, N.S., is sending a message of hope to Indigenous youth who are struggling with suicidal thoughts. Its video for We Matter — a national, multimedia anti-suicide campaign — reminds youth that they’re strong and to reach out for help if they need it. “I just wanted to try and uplift any person feeling bad ...

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